Protoculture – Music Is More Than Mathematics [out now]

May 2nd, 2014

Cape Town, South Africa – for some, it’s one of the most remote locations on earth, practically the stuff of legends. For Nate Raubenheimer, the tip of the southernmost African country is home. Armin van Buuren has said of the man, “Everything he touches turns to musical gold.” Really, there can be no stronger endorsement, nor can there be a statement more accurate.

His is a classic tale – inspired at the age of 8, it wasn’t long before his life’s journey led him to audio engineering school, and ultimately, to the largest festivals in the world. Protoculture’s fans are filled with an almost feverish adoration, the kind of hard-earned reputation that only someone with genuine talent can enjoy. Success hasn’t been all roses for the producer, however, as his hometown is one of the worst spots to travel from for an internationally touring DJ.

‘Music Is More Than Mathematics’ is an appropriate title for this album, as there’s absolutely no formula for what Protoculture does. If “awesome” could be bottled into a jar, it would be this record. Finding better descriptors is as pointless as trying to compete with his musical talents.

Even though each record radiates the artist behind the controls, Protoculture was able to attract talented producers, songwriters, and vocalists to help realize this record. Christian Burns, Johnny Yono, Max Graham, Jennifer Rene, and Tricia McTeague are some of the multitalented collaborators that made ‘Music Is More Than Mathematics’ possible, and their respective contributions seem to come at the precise time they’re needed in this musical journey.

Certain albums defy conventional logic, and certain sounds are so transcendental that it’s hard to see “trance” as anything but the right term. This is a special release, and one that covers as much territory as Protoculture’s frequent trips around the globe.